Writing Better Queries Presentation Materials

I delivered a webcast for the PASS DBA Virtual Chapter yesterday. It was called Tips & Tricks for Writing Better Queries. I really appreciated everyone who made the time to attend. I hope you found it to be time well spent.

As promised, here is a copy of the slide deck and demonstration code I used during the session. Please let me know if you have any questions.

The presentation was recorded and should be available on the PASS web site within a few days.

Related Posts

How To Write Better Queries WebCast

One character. That’s all it takes; just one character in a Transact-SQL query can make the difference between an index seek and an index scan.

Transact-SQL is easy to learn. But to truly get the best performance from your SQL Server you must have a good understanding beyond the basics of syntax. To become a Transact-SQL Superhero, you must be aware of some of the nuances of the language and how little things can affect your queries.

PASS DBA Virtual Chapter LiveMeeting Event

On Wednesday, 23 February, 2011, at noon Eastern Standard Time, I’ll share some of the lessons I’ve learned during my years of working with SQL Server. We’ll discuss indexing, stored procedures, triggers, and even user-defined functions.

I hope you’ll join me for this free webcast.

Related Posts

My devLINK Abstracts

For the past few years, I’ve spoken at a great event in Nashville called devLINK. I’ve really enjoyed speaking there.

Although it more developer oriented, it’s got a great SQLSaturday kind of feel. It’s heavily community oriented and has an intimate atmosphere about it. At 800 people, it’s also got the breadth of sessions and networking opportunities of a much larger event.

This year, devLINK has moved from its tradition home of Nashville to Chattanooga, Tennessee. Personally, I’m not thrilled about the move. It’s no longer just down the road and it’s going to be more a hassle for me to attend. But I’ll be there.

I’ve submitted six abstracts for the event. Hopefully some will be selected.

Locking & Blocking Made Simple

A good working knowledge of how SQL Server makes use of locking and transaction isolation levels can go a long way toward improving an application’s performance. In this session, we will explore SQL Server’s locking methodology and discover techniques for enhancing query response times.

Say Goodbye to Boring Meetings

Ever been in a meeting that drones on and on? It starts late, runs long, and doesn’t really accomplish anything. It’s a complete waste of everyone’s time. Worse yet, since nothing was resolved you’ll have to have a follow up meeting. Argh!

In this session you’ll learn some of the keys to conducting an effective meeting. You’ll gain practical tips for making your meetings more productive and dramatically improving one of the most inefficient parts of your day.

Getting Started in IT Consulting

Do you have the expressed goal or the suppressed desire to become an independent consultant? Think it’s too risky? Don’t know where to start? In this session, I’ll help you create a clear transition strategy to go from full-time employee to full-time independent IT consultant with a minimum of risk along the way.

I’ll discuss:

  • The many hats of a consultant
  • Strategies for minimizing risk
  • Setting up your business
  • How to handle sales
  • Low cost promotions
  • Some best practices

The PowerShell Cookbook for the DBA

The best DBAs work hard so that they don’t have to, well, work hard. In this session, we’ll discuss how you can use the PowerShell cmdlets and snap-ins to create scripts that automate the more mundane tasks in your role as a DBA or developer. We’ll create scripts that check the status of SQLAgent jobs, verify the configuration of your servers, and retrieves information from your SQL Server database. You can even store your results in a database table if you’d like. This session is mostly demos with only a few PowerPoint slides to get us started.

“I got promoted! Now what?”

You were a rockstar DBA/Developer. You could leap tall buildings and tune databases in a single bound. Life was grand. And then you got promoted. The skills that helped make a rockstar DBA/Developer won’t help you in management. In fact, some of those skills could actually be a hindrance. In this session we’ll discuss the new skills you’ll to hone to excel as a manager like, skills like: managing former peers, delegating to get more done, working more productively, giving effective feedback, and conducting effective meetings.

The Fundamentals of Good Negotiating

Creatively resolving differences and negotiating mutually beneficial agreements is crucial in all walks of life. It’s especially important and challenging in the IT industry where soft skills are not necessarily prevalent. 

In this session, we’ll introduce the basic concepts and precepts that will aid you in negotiating better agreements with your neighbors, peers, and even your boss.

The Art of Delegation

“Just do it.” That may have been a successful slogan for an athletic shoe manufacturer, but it’s no way to delegate tasks to your team. To successfully motive and lead your team, you must delegate in a way that encourages and motives yet accomplishes your goals. In this session, we’ll discuss proven tactics to get lead your team and get the results you need through the Art of Delegation.

Which Would You Choose?

I’m curious. Which of the sessions I’ve submitted would you choose? Are there some other topics that I should consider submitting?

If you’re a speaker and want to submit an abstract or two, the call for speakers ends on May 1st, 2011.

Related Posts

Meet Me In Florida!

While much of North America is bracing for the Snowpocalypse 2011, my thoughts are turning to sunny Florida.

I’m not just thinking of an escape from the cold, dreary weather that February brings with it. No, I’m thinking of the warm hospitality of sunny Orlando and SQLConnections.

I’m going to deliver a couple of sessions at the conference. Check out all of the sessions.

SSC01: Locking and Blocking Made Simple
A good working knowledge of how SQL Server makes use of locking and transaction isolation levels can go a long way toward improving an application’s performance. In this session, we will explore SQL Server’s locking methodology and discover techniques for enhancing query response times.

SSC04: Tips and Tricks for Writing Better Queries
Transact-SQL is not a very difficult language to learn. As long as the syntax is correct, it can be quite forgiving. However, to truly get the best performance from your SQL Server, careful consideration should be given to the structure and logic of the queries. In this session, we’ll discuss some Transact-SQL tips and tricks that can be employed to help you write better queries, allowing your server to perform better.

As I tune into the weather channel and see the nasty arctic weather that’s pelting almost 1/2 of the continental United States, I can hardly wait. I hope to see you there, too.

 

How To Choose A Topic For Speaking

“The human brain starts working the moment you are born and never stops until you stand up to speak in public.” observed Academy Award winning movie producer George Jessel. I think there is some truth to that for many of us.

As a regular speaker at conferences, SQLSaturdays, and other organizations, I’m often asked about public speaking. Some ask about preparation. Others ask about getting started. The most common question is about selecting a topic. That’s one question I can’t answer; I can only share how I do it.

Sharing Your Experiences

Let’s start with the mindset. The way I approach selecting a topic is to first remind myself that I’m not claiming to be an expert in the topic. In fact, I don’t claim to be an expert in anything, really. I don’t pretend to know everything about a subject.

When I speak, my goal is simple – to share my experiences and hopefully help someone else who’s about to go through something similar. Whether it’s troubleshooting a poorly performing server or helping to coach a new technical manager, I want to give them the benefit of my trials and observations. This takes the pressure off of me.

Selecting Potential Topics

As I think about potential topics, I usually consider a few things. First, I look for topics that I’m already pretty familiar with but would like to learn even more. Most every session I give requires me to do research. Preparing to teach something is the best way to really learn it. So, if you’re going to have to do some research, it may as well be in something that interests you, something you’d like to learn more about.

I also look for topics that are underserved in the community. Or put another way, I seek topics that have broad appeal but haven’t been done over and over again by other speakers. These topics aren’t necessarily obvious at first, but if you persist you can usually identify a few.

Finally, I tend to favor entry-level to mid-level topics. Sure, there’s a lot of glory in providing the very high end sessions, but the vast majority of attendees will not be ready for that depth of content. There’s a great need for entry-level to mid-level sessions. This goes back to the prior point: if other speakers tend to gravitate toward the high-end sessions, the mid-level sessions may be underserved in the community.

Creating An Abstract

Once you’ve selected a topic, the next step is to write the abstract.

Creating an abstract is an art. You’ve got to give people a reason to come to your session (or the program committee a reason to select your session for the conference). Stating just the facts about the session in a dry way won’t do that. Make it catchy. Make it compelling.

The title is the first impression they’ll get so you’ll want to put some thought into crafting a good title for your session. Consider titles like:

  • From Zero to Replication in 30 Minutes
  • The Four Pillars of Performance Tuning
  • Manage Your Calendar Or Someone Else Will

The body of the abstract supports and clarifies the title. I usually start with a description of the problem and then talk about the information I’ll convey in the session to help solve the problem.

A Sample Abstract

Consider this real-world abstract that I’ve delivered many times at conferences and Lunch & Learns.

Say Goodbye to Boring Meetings
Ever been in a meeting that drones on and on? It starts late, runs long, and doesn’t really accomplish anything. It’s a complete waste of everyone’s time. Worse yet, since nothing was resolved you’ll have to have a follow up meeting. Argh!

In this session you’ll learn some of the keys to conducting an effective meeting. You’ll gain practical tips for making your meetings more productive and dramatically improving one of the most inefficient parts of your day. You’ll also learn how to help improve meetings your don’t run.

Submitting the Abstract

Once you’ve created the abstract, share it was a few people that you trust to provide candid feedback. Ask them for help with refining your draft to a polished and professional form. Then you can submit it to the local user group, SQLSaturday, Lunch & Learn, or conference.

For More Information

A couple of years ago, I shared my experiences with and techniques for creating presentations in an article I wrote for Simple-Talk.

So what are you waiting for? Get out there and start speaking.

Got any other tips that I’ve missed? I’d love to hear from you with your tips for selecting a topic.

The World’s Largest

Each year, the Georgia Bulldogs and the Florida Gators meet on the college grid iron in what’s called the world’s largest cocktail party. I’ve never been; in fact I’m probably not welcomed since I’m an alumni of a rival school, the Auburn Tigers. War Eagle!

You Can’t Handle The SQL!

Last week, I attended another “world’s largest” event: the PASS Community Summit. With over 3,000 attendees, it’s the largest SQL Server-only event in the world. There are over 150 break out sessions, it has several rooms for hands-on labs complete with Microsoft folks to help you with specific SQL issues, and there are plenty of exhibitors there to see.


5168244649_b0342ff6f4.jpg

 

It’s got more technical content that your mind can absorb without exploding. Don’t believe me? Just watch Dr. David DeWitt’s Thursday morning keynote address and then tell me how your brain feels. Mine rapidly turned to mush as neurons overheated while struggling to process everything he said.

We Are Family!

But I don’t really think of PASS in those terms. No, to me all of the education at PASS is just a side benefit; it’s the icing on the cake. I think of the Summit as the World’s Largest SQL Family Reunion.

Each fall at this community event, I have the opportunity, no the absolute pleasure, to spend time with friends from around the world. It’s a special week that I look forward to all year long.

Some of the traditions are deeply rooted and planned months in advanced. This year’s SQL Karaoke found over 80 people belting out the tunes in American Idol-like fashion.

SQLKilt is another tradition growing in popularity. Plus there are the breakfasts, the dinners, and the after parties.

5165411664_178818fbc9_m.jpg

But my favorites are the impromptu gatherings. Having coffee with a friend from Europe, sharing a lunch table with someone I’ve only met through Twitter, and bumping into good friends from other states in the hallways. That’s what gets my blood to pumping and brings a smile to my face.

The technical content is good, but it’s the relationships that matter most to me.

So, to everyone I saw in Seattle last week: Know that I cherish the time that we got to spend together. And if we didn’t get a chance to catch up, let’s not let that happening again next year.

This community rocks.

See you all again next year.

The PowerShell CookBook

“A script club.” That’s what a friend of mine said when he was telling me how he’d learned the basics of PowerShell. I did a double take. “You had a user group meeting at a strip club?!?!” He laughed and clarified, this time enunciating more clearly.

cutting board image

Last week at the PASS Community Summit in Seattle, I delivered a session called The PowerShell CookBook. In it, I demonstrated some scripts that I use when auditing SQL Server instances. I showed how to programmatically collect a list of SQL Server instances and then iterate through each instance to gather information about its configuration parameters, databases, and jobs.

As promised in the session, I’ve made the scripts available for you to use and tweak to suit your own needs.

If you were in the session, thanks for coming! I hope you found it worthwhile! After the session, someone asked if I’d be willing to deliver the session remotely to their user group. The answer is yes; just contact me using twitter, email, or a comment to this blog and we’ll work out a time.

See you next time!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 34 other followers